Aunt Laura

AUNT LAURA WINSTON

On February 2, 1852, a daughter, Laura Davenport, was born to Nancy Davenport, a slave for Capt. R. R. Davenport, who owned the G.M.D. Lowry farm south of Valley Head Cross Roads. Shortly after Laura was born her father was sold to a slave holder farther south, and after Aunt Laura grew up she (told) of how her mother would go (down) across the oak lawn to the (road) side, when droves of slaves were being taken either north or south, ever hoping that she might again see the face of her husband. But she never saw him.

Laura was freed at the age of nine and at thirteen married Albert Winston, ex-slave of William O. Winston of Valley Head. The ceremony took place at the home of Capt. Stewart where E. T. Davenport how lives. Following the ceremony W. O. Winston gave them a big wedding dinner at Winston Place attended by hosts of colered and white alike.

and Uncle Frank’s first house was a log shack in Wills Valley, four north of Valley Head where Albert worked for Jake Bean. Here their first child, John was born when Aunt Laura was only fifteen.

In a few years they moved just east of the viaduct leading to Lookout Mountain, in nothing but wooded area, they built a log hut and fell the timber and had new ground for crops. Laura would send Jimmy and across the ridge over an Indian tramped trail to Cisero and Helen Davenport’s to get buttermilk and occasionally a mess of turnip greens. Helen would always give the little darkies a big fluffy wheat biscuit with a slab of butter sandwiched between it.

As the years rolled by, they moved from place to place, and Aunt Laura gave to the world eleven children. In 1902 when Ida Bell, her youngest child was only two, Albert died and left Aunt Laura and her eleven children alone in the world. For several years she continued to keep house and left the young children in care of the older ones and went to work for such people as Rev. J. M. White, Aunt Molly Nicholason, Uncle C. Y. and Aunt Culberson, Uncle Nick and Aunt Ida Davenport. When Aunt Ida was a baby (Aunt Laura) was her colored ………for her du…….

Transcribed from old crumpled page, author unknown.

Old Valley Head Cemetery

Old Valley Head Cemetery Restoration Project

The above stone has no name. There are many graves in the

Old Valley Head Cemetery, most are unmarked. An effort is

under way to make the cemetery more accessible and to gather the

historical information related to the Deans, Coopers, Burdens, Taylors

and others buried at the site of the first and oldest Valley Head Baptist Church site.

Thomas Dean Lucretia Dean

James Cooper Lucinda Cooper

William B. Taylor, Jr.

Update From Alfred Ellis

December 24, 2018

My grandfather, Alfred (Bud) Ellis was a first cousin to Luther Ellis’ adopted father William.
I have an Ellis reunion photo which includes my grandfather Bud Ellis, Luther Ellis, and the Rev. Charlie Dean(WZOB game). I knew there was some connection of Luther and Charlie, but just didn’t how?. I think I finally made the connection.

Charlie Dean was the son of Lorenzo Dean. Thus Lottie Dean was the aunt of Charlie Dean who preached on WZOB radio for many years.

Charlie Dean burial correction CHARLIE DEAN is buried in the Walnut Grove Cemetery. His father Lorenzo is buried at Wesley’s Chapel. Charlie Dean’s Aunt Lottie Dean Watkins Lankford is buried  in the Lankford Cemetery.

Bouldin

Bouldins of Valley Head

My grandfather was Abraham Lincoln Bouldin, and based on my research was the the son of Elijah Jackson Bouldin and Effy Emilene Hill Bouldin. Grandpa Abe moved from Alabama to Oklahoma married Annis Patience Edwards in Chickasaw Indian Territory, then moved his family to the Rio Grande Valley of Texas, where he died Jan. 16, 1927 and is buried in Combes Cemetery, Cameron County, Texas.  I plan to visit the area later this summer and would love to be able to see where my grandfather grew up.

Contributor: Susan Brotzman  Jul 6, 2015

Ralph L. White

The Polar Bears
Hello, I think I have identified another name to
add to your “Veteran’s of Valley Head” web
page.
I should probably begin by explaining a bit
about myself and how I came to this conclusion.

My name is Michael V. Grobbel and I live in
Shelby Township, which is north of Detroit, MI.
My wife of 32 years, the former Kathy Yancy,
was born in Ft. Payne, AL in 1952, and moved
to the Detroit area with her parents in 1963.
My hobby is researching my family’s history,
including their military service (fortunately, my
sister-in-law has taken on the task of
researching her
Yancy/Townsel/Culpepper/White family lines
in the Sand Mountain area).
My grandfather, Clement Grobbel, was born in
Warren Township, Michigan in 1895. He was
drafted into the US Army’s 339th Infantry
Regiment in June of 1918 and received his
basic training at Camp Custer, near Battle
Creek, Michigan. The 339th was sent to
England in August of 1918, but instead of going
to France, they were assigned to the American
North Russia Expeditionary Force (ANREF).
The 5,000 men of the ANREF were placed
under British command, and together with
Allied French, British and White Russian forces,
they fought the Communists in the region
surrounding Archangel, North Russia, from
September 1918 until June of 1919. They
were considered to be World War One
veterans, even though they continued fighting
for more than 7 months after the Armistice.
Upon their return to the USA, the ANREF
veterans began calling themselves “Polar
Bears”, since they had fought in the sub-arctic
region during the dead of winter.
Most (80% or so) of the Polar Bears who were
drafted and inducted into the 339th Infantry
came from Michigan and the other Great Lakes
states, however almost all the other states in
the Union were represented in their ranks.
Recently, while browsing through an on-line
database listing of Polar Bears arranged by
geographic location, I noticed that there were
nine men from different places in Alabama.
What particularly caught my eye was the
location “Valley Head, AL” in the database,
which I knew to be just down the road from my
wife’s birthplace.

Clicking on the “Valley Head, AL” location in the
database, I saw the name White Ralph name
and information of this “Polar Bear”:

White, Ralph L.
company: United States. Army. Infantry,
339th. Supply.
hometown: Valley Head (Ala.)

Hmmmm, I thought – could my dear wife also
have a relative who was a “Polar Bear” ? I
quickly checked my sister-in-law’s genealogy
database, but he was not listed in there. Next, I
did a Google search and I found a White, Ralph
L. on page 138 of your PDF document which gave this
information about him:
White, Ralph L.
b. Feb 1892 in AL
occupation: Helper mill
d. Sept 1943
bur. Valley Head, AL

His birth date is in the correct range of years for
these Polar Bear veterans and the middle
initials match, so I am quite sure this is the
same person mentioned in the Polar Bear
database. Unfortunately, I cannot find any
mention of his rank in the Polar Bear
information. If you decide to add his name to
your Veteran’s page, I would identify him as a
member of Supply Company, 339th Infantry
Regiment, US Army, WW I American North
Russia Expeditionary Force, 1918-1919. Here
is a “http://polarbears.si.umich.edu/index.pl
photo of Supply Company, but their members are not identified.
I should also add that I am the President (and
webmaster) of the “Polar Bear Memorial
Association”. In addition to the
href=”http://pages.prodigy.net/mvgrobbel/ph
otos/polarbear.htm” we maintain, we also conduct an annual
“http://pages.prodigy.net/mvgrobbel/ph
otos/polarbearevents.htm”Memorial Day
service for the Polar Bears. Most people
in the USA are not aware that US troops fought
the Soviet Communists on Russian soil and our
Association’s purpose is to make sure that their
service, sacrifices and deaths are not
forgotten.
Contact me at:
“http://grobbel.org/contact.html”
Visit my webpages at: “http://grobbel.org”
Contributed by -Mike Grobbel-

Daniel B. Young

Daniel B. Young
Contributed by Cordell October 25, 2008
No one can know what influenced Daniel Bryson Young b. 1824 NC, to move from North Carolina to Lumpkin County, Georgia. The 1828 discovery of gold in North Georgia had offered short-lived excitement; however, as late as 1870, the U. S. Federal Census indicates that some were still listing “Gold Miner” as their occupation. The last Georgia Land Lottery was held in 1832, yet none of these facts answers the mystery of Daniel’s decision to make such a life-changing move. In Georgia, Daniel married Elizabeth J. Adams; daughter of George Berry Adams and Martha Ahearn. The first of Daniel and Elizabeth’s eleven children was born on 16 Mar 1854.
By 1861, when the War Between the States officially commenced, Daniel and Elizabeth already had five small children. On 23 May 1862, Daniel enlisted as a Private into Co. C, 52nd Regiment, GA Vol. Infantry, Army of Tenn., C.S.A. He contracted measles which settled in his left lung, causing permanent disability. Two months later, he received a Disability Discharge at Big Creek Gap, Tenn. War records show Daniel B. Young’s birthplace to be Burke Co., NC. On the 1860 U.S. Federal Census Daniel B. and Elizabeth Yang are reported to be living in Frogtown Dist., Lumpkin Co., GA. The Post Office: Loudsville. (near Licklog) At that time, the record shows them to have four children. Daniel’s occupation is listed as ‘Farmer.’ The name “Young” was misspelled by the census taker as “YANG”. The family is shown living next door to Elizabeth’s father, George Adams b. 1789 SC. Soon after Daniel’s discharge, he and his family moved to Dekalb Co., AL,. where their fifth child, Mary Eveline Young, my g-grandmother, was born. She married Jefferson Alexander Thomas, son of John M. Thomas and Elizabeth Josephine Stafford. The 1870 U.S. Federal Census reflects Daniel B. and Elizabeth Young, along with their nine children living in Township 4, Range 10, Dekalb Co., AL, Post Office: Sulphur Springs. In 1880 Daniel and Elizabeth Young are shown with ten children, (including one grandchild), living in Township 5, Range 10, Dekalb Co., AL. (Two of their children were out of the home.) Four generations in Valley Head, AL:
1) Daniel Bryson Young m. Elizabeth J. Adams
2) Mary Eveline Young m. Jefferson Alexander Thomas
3) Mary Lily Thomas m. Henry David Cordell
4) Rena Edna Cordell m. James Franklin Akins
The next two generations of our family line grew up in Valley Head, AL. Life there was dependent on agriculture and the hard manual labor associated with raising and preserving crops. Farming was done with mules pulling hand-held plows. Most planting and harvesting was done by hand. Wagons and mules provided transportation. (Henry Cordell rode a mule fifteen miles into Fort Payne to serve on Jury Duty.)
A good harvest determined how well a family ate during winter months. Home canning became popular when my mother, Rena Cordell b. 1913, was a teen. She remembered learning these skills from the Home Extension Office and then teaching classes for their neighbors in her backyard. Before the advent of home canning, vegetables and fruits were dried or pickled and meat was treated with salt and hung in a smokehouse to cure. My grandmother, Mary Lily (Thomas) Cordell, filled a large storage pantry with canned goods. She cooked for a family of twelve; plus, as many as, forty guests for Sunday dinner. Chickens roamed freely before the early 1930’s when a hen-house was built for nesting. The pasture was enclosed by a split-rail fence with a gate built of slabs from the saw mill. The outhouse was considered to be a nice one since it was a “two-seater.” An old Sears, Roebuck Catalog was conveniently hung on a wire. My mother, Rena Cordell, recalled the flu epidemic in 1918 when she was five years old. They were blessed that no one in their family was touched with the dread sickness. Mother remembered that her daddy, Henry Cordell, rode in the wagon to each home in the area, making certain that families with sick folk had firewood cut and stacked close to the door for easy access. Mother was raised in a God-fearing home and my life has been blessed because of her faithfulness to Christian principles. She went Home to Glory in 2006 at 93 years of age.

Albert Winston

Albert Winston Family
Contributed December 2006
Albert Winston was born about 1847 in Valley Head, Alabama. Probably the son or grandson of “Uncle John” Winston, Negro slave to William Overton Winston. Uncle John was given to Mr. Winston at birth and would become his valet for life. Uncle John was a few years older than William, and based on census records his birth is about 1790.
In 1865, Albert Winston married Laura Davenport, daughter of Nancy Davenport, slave to Capt. R. R. Davenport. Laura Davenport was born February 2, 1852 in Valley Head, Alabama. At the age of nine, she was freed and at the age of 13 she married Albert. Albert worked for Mr. Jake Bean, just north of Valley Head, and on July 1868, Laura and Albert’s first child was born, John Winston. They would have nine more children together: Joe O., 1872; James S., 1873; Henry, 1877; Nancy A., 1879; Mary A. 1884; Laura, 1885; Albert, 1890; Lucy, 1892; and Ida B., 1900.
In 1902, Albert Winston died and was buried in a cemetery northeast of Valley Head. Laura Davenport Winston went to work to support her children, she work for the families of Rev. J. M. White, Molly Nicholson, C.Y. Culberson, as well as, Nick and Ida Davenport. Laura died in 1938.
John Winston married Susie Green
Joe O. Winston married Mary Adams
James Winston married Mary Florence McMickens, and Addie Hill
Nancy A. Winston married Oscar Harrison
Laura Winston married Rufus Jake Neal
Lucy Winston married Harper Davenport
Ida B. Winston never married.   Contributed by -Denese Walters-


Descendants of Albert Winston

1 Albert Winston 1847 – 1902
.. +Laura Davenport 1852 - 1938
…….. 2 John Winston 1868 - 1960
………… +Susie Green 1879 - 1953
………………. 3 Pearl Green Winston 1907 - 1982
………………….. +Rosa Lee Spears - 1989
………………. 3 Effie Mae Winston 1902 - 1980
………………….. +Charlie Word 1900 - 1977
………………. 3 William F. Winston 1905 - 1968
…….. 2 Joe O. Winston 1872 -
………… +Mary Adams 1875 -
………………. 3 Fannie Winston 1896 -
………………. 3 Guss Winston 1901 - 1977
………………….. +Bettie N. Noles 1908 -
……………………….. 4 Gussie M. Winston 1928 -
………………. 3 Russell Winston 1901 -
………………. 3 Joe Jr. Winston 1895 - 1968
………………….. +Clara Stargin - 2003
………………. 3 Joe Winston 1895 -
………………. 3 Bob Winston 1900 -
………………. 3 Job Winston 1900 -
…….. 2 James S. Winston 1873 - 1971
………… +Mary Florence McMichens 1882 - 1917
………………. 3 Geneva Winston 1898 - 2000
………………….. +Jesse Wright 1899 - 1969
………………. 3 Annie Winston 1901 -
………………. 3 Mary E. Winston 1907 -
………………. 3 Katie Winston 1908 -
………………….. +Frank Sr. Williams
………………. 3 James T. Winston 1910 - 1991
………………. 3 Paul M. Sr. Winston 1912 - 1997
………………….. +Olivia Witherspoon 1915 - 2002
……………………….. 4 Paul M. Jr. Winston - 1989
…….. *2nd Wife of James S. Winston:
………… +Addie Hill 1893 -
…….. 2 Henry Winston 1877 -
…….. 2 Nancy A. Winston 1879 - 1968
………… +Oscar Harrison 1869 - 1959
………………. 3 Lawarnce Harrison 1899 -
………………. 3 Florence Harrison 1899 -
………………. 3 Lottie Harrison 1901 -
………………. 3 Violet Harrison 1903 -
………………. 3 Amos Harrison 1905 -
………………. 3 Inez Harrison 1908 -
………………. 3 Oscar W. Harrison 1909 -
………………. 3 Greg Harrison
………………. 3 Bill Harrison 1910 -
………………. 3 Jean H. Harrison 1914 -
………………. 3 Leon Harrison 1913 -
………………. 3 Nonnie R. Harrison 1915 -
…….. 2 Mary A. Winston 1884 -
…….. 2 Laura Winston 1885 -
………… +Rufus Jake Neal 1878 -
………………. 3 Willis Neal 1905 -
………………. 3 Jessie Neal 1907 -
………………. 3 Clarance Neal 1908 -
………………. 3 Ritty Neal 1917 -
…….. 2 Albert Winston 1890 -
…….. 2 Lucy Winston 1892 -
………… +Harper Davenport 1888 -
…….. 2 Ida B. Winston 1900 - 1994

What’s Your Story?

My story began in 1951. Born at home in a small four room house on Alabama highway 137. Mom said all the floors were dirt except one. Which one? No clue. In 1987 I began looking into my family history and thought how neat a web page would be to share the life of Not so Famous people. You know the ones. The people who hold this Great Nation together, they are the connective tissue making the Great Experiment work. I thought I would find a few unknown relatives and make a short work of my research. Wrong. I found very distant relatives with stories dating back to the 1500’s. Some more recent connections I am still trying to track down. For example, my grandfather, Luther O’Neal Ellis who was adopted by William Ellis and Sarah Margaret Blevins, of Valley Head, Alabama. I know his biological mother was Paralee E. Willis (1865-1936) and he had a sister, Evergreen (1881/89-1966) who married Bejamin F. York. Evergreen was adopted by Harrison Gatlin and Sarah Lewis. So the mystery is who was the biological father? Upon learning of this mystery I didn’t think much of it, until I decided to take one of those DNA test to learn about my family and health. Then the biology became very important.